I Am Me…;)

November 30, 2008

Hi everyone! 🙂

I am glad to announce that Sheena has joined Edutainment, so from now on you’ll be enjoying great piano lessons from both Chrissi, Sheena, and myself.

Sheena is a total piano lover and she’s ready to join in the fun.
But before me telling you more about her, why not have her speak by herself: ;o)

Hello piano novices,My name is Sheena, and I will be contributing to the Piano Video Tutorial column. There are two things I can’t stand:

1. Blindly trying to figure out which key strokes on a black and ivory will make the sounds of my favorite songs and 2. Finding time between my morning hours of nothing and my late day nap to search the net for tutorial videos…

My newest endeavor is to continue what this site has started: providing various video tutorials of classic and modern songs played on piano by unknown avid pianists and by the original bands. Music to my ears, right? Look out for new piano tutorials coming to your computer soon. Ciao!

xoxo Sheena

Start casting your vote!
Tell Sheena and me what you’d like to learn next!

You may also propose us songs not listed in there by writing the song you want to learn next in the “other” field:

Cheers!

Questor

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Piano Encyclopedia Lesson Report: Music Fundamentals Release Today!

October 6, 2008

Hi Everyone,

I’d like to tell you about Piano Encyclopedia’s upcoming release of the Piano Lesson Report I: Music Fundamentals on October 5th at 4pm EST. We’ve shown you videos on how to play certain songs throughout our blog and thought that the Piano Lesson Report could really help you out in actually understanding how to play those songs you love.

It can be difficult learning a song without actually knowing what the keys are called and how they should be played with a certain note, so Piano Lesson Report I: Music Fundamentals could help you understand how to play all those songs you love.

Let me show you some of the things that Piano Lesson Report I: Music Fundamentals includes so you can see what I mean when I say you could actually understand how to play the songs, instead of just knowing what key to push.

Get to know the fundamentals of composing, and improvising:
Discover how mastering scales, chords, and music intervals will take your piano skills to the next level.

Starting right at the beginning: chords, scales, and music intervals explained!

Discover how to use intervals to play any chord or scale type on ANY key, without having to memorize every single note.

Understand why chords sound like they do, find out the relationship between music intervals and the basic chord types.

Master the major and minor triad chords and learn to play them on any key- by using the music intervals.

Get a sneak peak into more complex Jazz and Blues chords and the role music intervals play here too.

Discover the relationship between Scales and intervals, and get a sneak peak into some interesting scales.

Learn what scales or chords are usually helpful in creating a sad, melancholic, romantic, happy or cheerful mood for a song – and understand why.

Get an introduction to all the fundamentals so you’re ready to get into composing and improvising.

We’ve included Tons of Piano Interval & Chord Charts full of graphics, so you can print them out and practice everything right in your piano

And more…

As you can see you will actually get an understanding of the chords, scales, and intervals which could really help you out in the end because every song is created by a chord and then a scale and then intervals.

Check out the following screenshots from the report:

Now if you’d like to get your hands on Piano Lesson Report I: Music Fundamentals but are worried that its going to cost you tons of money, don’t be. Piano Encyclopedia is actually releasing it with no price, meaning you won’t have to pay for a thing. You will get 55+ pages of unique content, over 100+ illustrations, and over 7 piano charts without having to pay a thing. Now if you were to go to a music store and look for the same thing you’d pay an arm and a leg for numerous books that are full of nothing but repeat content in each.

The release will be on October 5th at 4pm EST, but Piano Encyclopedia is actually offering bonuses for those that subscribe to receive Piano Lesson Report I: Music Fundamentals before 4pm EST. If you are interested just simply click on the following title and it will take you there to do so.

Reserve Your Very Own Piano Lesson Report I: Music Fundamentals Now

You can also look through Piano Encyclopedia’s blog for further information on Piano Lesson Report I: Music Fundamentals. They have been updating their blog constantly to give the viewers more information on the release and reminding everyone the amount of time they have left before people can no longer reserve their spot to receive Piano Lesson Report I: Music Fundamentals plus the bonuses. You can still reserve your spot after 4pm EST, but you won’t receive the bonuses that are being included for the people that reserve their copy before 4pm EST.

Piano Encyclopedia’s Blog

Hope that I’ve helped you out even further with learning how to play your piano. Feel free to leave feedback or questions on Piano Lesson Report I: Music Fundamentals. I’ll gladly answer all questions and feedback that you throw at me.

~Chrissi~


Piano Lesson #22 – Apologize by One Republic

September 29, 2008
Piano Lesson #22

View all previous Piano / Keyboard Lessons

You are about to learn:
Artist:
One Republic
Song: Apologize

This is an amazing song that has become quite popular all over the American radio broadcasts with the help from Timbaland. One Republic was a band that not many knew about in various parts of the world, but now everyone is seeming to rave about them.

With the popularity of the song Apologize I thought it would be a great idea to teach everyone how to play this beautifully melodic song. If you haven’t heard this song before I highly recommend you listen to it. Here is a link to a video of this song so you can truly hear what I mean about this song being one of the best. This is the version that includes Timbaland because I feel this version gives you a better feel of the piano and emotional portrayal that it is trying to give its listeners.

I can truly say I myself can be caught singing this song any time I hear it and have downloaded & purchased the One Republic CD just so I can listen to it whenever I want. When you listen to this song the wording with the inclusion of the many different instruments such as the cello and violins just makes the song feel even more put together then most you hear on the top 100 music hits lists now a days.

Read the rest of this entry »


Piano Lessons Are Coming Back!

September 27, 2008

Hi all you piano fans,

I am happy to inform you that I will be bringing back the piano lessons again for you. I know its been quite some time since I’ve wrote a new piano lesson, but we’ve been working so hard on The Piano Encyclopedia to get it up and running for you that we haven’t put together any new piano lessons recently.

Well, you will be glad to know its time for me to sit down and bring out all those piano lessons that just need to be learn’t by you. First things first, what songs do you want to learn? What bands? Come on give me some ideas. Switch things up.

I know Coldplay was a definite hit and they seemed to get a lot of traffic so I will gladly put more of these, maybe also some older bands. The possibilities are endless. I’d like to get some suggestions so I know I am satisfying all your expectations, since that is exactly what we are here for. You want to learn new songs on the piano and I want to help you learn them, so let me know what you want and I’ll get it.

Over the past six months you’ve seen a few posts in our piano section that have been great and now we feel it is time to begin teaching you guys again. You can never know too many songs especially when you enjoy entertaining and playing the piano while everyone sits around talking.

In the past we’ve done lessons for the more recent bands, but I am thinking maybe we should include a few classical lessons, and maybe some jazz songs. I have so many ideas brewing away in my head that I think its time I let them loose on the world.

I am more then excited to be back doing the piano lessons and hope to see you guys leaving me many suggestions.

~Chrissi~


Enhancing your piano technique – Voicing

July 29, 2007

Vocing piano keyboard chords In easy ways, Voicing is the inversion of a chord. This is the vertical ordering of the notes of the chord, or in other words. which notes are on top, bottom, or in the middle.

This simple concept can change completely how rich and professional your playing sounds.
Geniuses like Bach, Chopin, Beethoven, Mozart, Liszt, always based their compositions in other to obtain the best voicing combinations for their musical phrases. However, this not only applies to classical music, a bad voicing can cause a jazz player to sound ‘cheap’ or very unprofessional, and a good voicing can make you be the most wanted piano bar player!

Fortunately, the secret of voicing can be summarized in one line:

You must always minimize the distance that each note of each chord must move in order to go to from the previous chord to the next chord.

Following this simple and amazing rule, your sound quality will improve greatly, and it’s just that easy for chords!

To expand into this subject, I invite you to read the following article, by the experienced pianist Paul Tobey:

It always amazes me when I hear different piano players and how they voice their chords. Voicing is one of those skills that is not talked about a lot but in my experience makes the biggest difference in a pianist’s overall sound.

What does voicing mean exactly? Simply put, voicing is the way chords are played which gives them their timbre or richness. In other words it’s how many notes are played, the distance between each of the notes and the quantity and quality of extensions.

There are literally thousands of ways to play a single chord. There are also millions of ways to play a chord progression if you consider that each chord can be played a thousand different ways. However, it’s likely a good idea to start off with a few solid possibilities instead of a thousand.

For example, let’s take a Cmaj7 chord. The chord itself is simple enough and is made up of C E G and B. However, depending on how rich you want the chord to sound you can also add D and A to the chord as extensions. Why? Because D and A come from the C major scale and do not clash with the basic chord.

These are what we call extensions. In other words a good pianist will already consider D and A in their chord voicing when they see the chord symbol Cmaj7. It doesn’t have to be written Cmaj7 (9 13) for them to understand this.

So, how would a pianist then voice this chord? Well, for starters, that depends on the melody. Whatever the melody note is will become the highest note of the chord. For example, let’s say D is the melody note of prominence while the chord is being played. That means that for a pianist our 9th is already understood as part of the chord and is the top note.

Next, it’s generally a good idea to play the bass note in the left hand which is C of course. Then the next 2 most important notes are the 3rd and the 7th because these notes give the chord its flavor. Consider playing the 7th in the left hand above the bass note. That would mean playing the C with finger 5 (baby finger) and B with finger 1 (thumb).

Then, play the 3rd, 5th and melody (9th) in the right hand with the 1st, 2nd and 5th fingers respectively. What’s left? The 13th or A which, you can cover with the 3rd finger of the right hand. So, from bottom to top you would have the notes in this order; C B E G A and D. That right there is a very rich sounding chord and you’d have to go a long way to find one richer.

However, this is only one way of voicing the chord. Like I said before there are literally thousands of ways. My suggestion is this; learn one way at a time until it becomes second nature. Voicing the root and 7th in the left hand and covering the 3rd and the melody in the right hand is a very good system to start with. Then with your left over fingers in the right hand cover the 5th and any other extension that’s available. This works for all chords including major, minor, dominant and diminished chords.

Once you’ve learned this way of voicing chords it becomes much easier to tackle a new formula because this one is already clear and concrete and will help you hear very clearly the difference between the chords. Until next time, keep practicing.

I hope you enjoyed this article as much as I did.

We expect your comments and questions, and if you’d like us to publish an article about any piano related topic just tell us!

Cheers and until next time!

Rod

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